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NWC News Desk

Philosophy of agriculture class starts March 24 in Powell

Posted March 11, 2009
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POWELL, Wyo. - Today's farmers are faced with decisions their predecessors never considered - organic practices, genetically modified crops and high-production options - to name a few. Micah Humphreys, an assistant professor of agroecology and range management at Northwest College, believes agricultural practitioners can look to the past for guidance on these issues.

He's teaching a one-credit philosophy of agriculture course to help tomorrow's farmers put today's dilemmas into historical context. He invites current farmers to join in the discussion. The class meets in Powell from 4-4:50 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays beginning March 24.

"The current trend towards organic and sustainable agriculture on one hand, and genetically modified, high production agriculture on the other," Humphreys said, "can be quite confusing for an agriculture major, even students straight from the farm."

He intends to better equip these students as the industry's future decision makers by helping them understand how current issues fit in the history of the discipline. Humphreys believes that by taking time to interact with both ancient and modern agricultural thought, students will be better able to consider the trajectories of ideas and philosophies behind current agriculture practice.

The course offers an introduction to the thought and literature of agriculture both ancient and modern. Emphasis will be on the discussion of readings from original sources so that students understand key perennial issues in the theory and practices of agriculture.

For more information about the class, e-mail Micah Humphreys or call (307) 754-6465.

Community members are invited to participate in the class as auditors or for a grade. To register, call (800) 560-4692.