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NWC News Desk

Teepee-raising and beading events launch Native American Heritage Month at NWC

Posted October 26, 2015
By NWC News Desk

POWELL, Wyoming — Area residents are invited to participate in a Monday, Nov. 2, Teepee-Raising and Wednesday, Nov. 4, Beading Night as Northwest College launches its celebration of Native American Heritage Month. Both events are free.

Johnny Tim Yellowtail, Hubert B. Two Leggins and Chris C. Finley will team up to raise a teepee in the yard of the NWC Intercultural House at 5 p.m. Monday, Nov. 2.

Yellowtail is a member of the Crow Nation raised in the Apsáalooke ways. Two Leggins is a former cultural director and tribal historic preservation officer currently serving as a board member on the Medicine Wheel Alliance and the National Elders Circle. Finley, adopted by the Hill family into the Crow Tribe, is an archaeologist who helped establish the NWC Archaeology Field School program through his position as cultural resource program manager for the Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area.

The three will discuss the significance of teepees to Native Americans, both historically and in today’s world. They’ll demonstrate how to raise a teepee honoring the Apsáalooke tradition, explaining how various tribal protocols call for differences in teepee-raising. They’ll also talk about the ceremonies still held today in Native American teepees.

Elder Berdick Tow Leggins of the Crow Tribe will be present to offer a blessing and prayer for Northwest College.

Two days later, Marenda Bearshield, a full-blooded member of the Kiowa Tribe of Oklahoma, will teach the first steps in learning how to bead at a 6:30 p.m. Beading Night Wednesday, Nov. 4, also at the NWC Intercultural House.

Participants will make their own jewelry pieces by beading simple hoops. All supplies are provided, and jewelry makers will select their own colors and beads. This class will lead to more advanced classes later in the year.

These are just two of the Native American Heritage events scheduled at NWC during November. Also on the calendar are the Thursday, Nov. 12, Buffalo Feast, a Thursday, Nov. 19, Fry Bread Lunch and a Sunday, Nov. 22, screening of “The Business of Fancydancing.”

The college kick started its celebration in October with a performance by Supaman, a champion dancer and award-winning hip hop musician.

Information about these and other events can be found on the NWC calendar at http://www.nwc.edu/calendar.